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THE CULTURE OF KANEKES TRIBE


HISTORY OF CULTURE | THE CULTURE OF KANEKES TRIBE | Kanekes person or persons Bedouin / Bedouin are an indigenous group in the Sunda region Lebak regency, Banten. Their population of about 5,000 to 8,000 people, and they constitute one of the tribes to apply isolation from the outside world. In addition they also have the confidence taboo to be photographed.


Etymology
The name "Bedouin" is the name given by residents outside the community group, originated from the term Dutch researchers who seem to equate them with Badawi Arab groups who are sedentary societies (nomadic). Another possibility is due to the River and Mountain Bedouin Bedouin in the northern part of the region. They themselves prefer to call themselves as urang Kanekes or "people Kanekes" according to their region name, or a designation that refers to the name of their village as Urang Cibeo (Garna, 1993). 

Community Groups
Kanekes people still have a historical relationship with the Sundanese. Physical appearance and their language is similar to the Sundanese people in general. The only difference is their beliefs and way of life. Kanekes people shut themselves from the influence of the outside world and strictly maintain their traditional way of life, while the Sundanese are more open to foreign influences and the majority embraced Islam.

Kanekes society in general is divided into three groups: tangtu, panamping, and dangka (Permana, 2001).

Tangtu group is a group known as Kanekes In (In the Bedouin), who most closely follow the custom, namely residents living in three villages: Cibeo, Cikertawana, and Cikeusik. Characteristic Kanekes People are dressed in white, natural and dark blue and wearing a white headband. They were forbidden by custom to meet with foreigners (non-citizen)

Kanekes In is part of the whole person Kanekes. Unlike Kanekes Outside, residents Kanekes In still adhere to customs of their ancestors. 


Most of the rules adopted by the tribe Kanekes In include:
  1. Not allowed to use vehicles to transport
  2. Not allowed to use footwear
  3. Door of the house should face north / south (except the chairman's house Pu'un or customary)
  4. Prohibition of use of electronic tools (technology)
  5. Using fabric, black / white as the clothes are woven and sewn himself, and not allowed to use modern clothing.
  6. The second community group called panamping are those known as Kanekes Outer (Outer Baduy), who lived in various villages scattered around the region Kanekes In, like Cikadu, Kaduketuk, Kadukolot, Gajeboh, Cisagu, and so forth. Community Kanekes Foreign distinctively dressed and black headband.
  7. Foreign Kanekes are people who have come out of peoples and regions Kanekes In. There are several things that cause the release of citizens to Kanekes Kanekes In Outer:
  8. They have violated customary Kanekes In society.
  9. Desiring to get out of Kanekes In
  10. Married to a member of Foreign Kanekes
  11. The characteristics of the people Kanekes Foreign
  12. They have known technologies, such as electronic equipment, although its use remains a ban for every citizen Kanekes, including residents of Foreign Kanekes. They use the equipment in a way secretly to escape detection for superintendent of Kanekes In.
  13. The development process Kanekes Foreign houses have been using assistive devices, such as saws, hammers, nails, etc., which previously prohibited by customary Kanekes In.
  14. Using traditional dress with black or dark blue (for men), which indicates that they are not holy. Sometimes using modern clothes such as T-shirts and jeans.
  15. Using modern household appliances, such as mattresses, pillows, plates & cups glass & plastic.
  16. They live outside the area Kanekes In.
If Kanekes Inner and Outer Kanekes Kanekes lived in the area, then "Kanekes Dangka" Kanekes live outside the area, and currently resides in the remaining two villages, namely Padawaras (Cibengkung) and Sirahdayeuh (Cihandam). Dangka village serves as a sort of buffer zone of influence from outside (Permana, 2001).

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